Sunday, 14 July 2013

Froogs on the Radio


Hello Dear Reader,

I'm always happy to share the frugal word with everyone and love being a guest on Tracy Wilson's radio programme on Radio Cornwall. We were talking about the cost of food today, the need for Foodbanks, frugal food and school packed lunches. You can listen again by clicking  HERE and moving the slider onto the last hour. The photo above is taken from a snap from the webcam and I've got my back to the camera.


We've had a massively busy afternoon. Too busy in this heat! Shopping and again, I am aghast at the cost of just some fruit, veg, milk and eggs! We then went to the tip to take a trailer full of garden waste and then onto Trago to buy more wood bark chips to mulch our garden. 


It was then home to more 'gardening'. In this case, weeding the end wall of our garden which can be viewed from the street. It's a mess and we've managed half of it tonight before we both retreated to have cooling showers. 


You can see my house peeping over the top of the fence. It goes on the market on the first of August; the deadline is looming and we still have so much to do. It would be interesting to hear from anyone who uses Foodbanks or is worried about the extra costs of feeding the family throughout the school six week break. If you'd like to leave me a comment, then I won't publish it if you ask me not to. Feel free to email me if you would like me to run a cookery workshop on basic cooking skills, menu planning, cooking from scratch or bulk cooking. If anyone can get three people together for a workshop (two is too few and four is too many) then I'll run it free of charge. I'll have time in my summer break to make videos that people have asked for on cookery techniques such as making pastry, cheese sauce, quiche and using a bread machine. For now? I'm off for a cold drink and ready to put my feet up and watch the highlights of Chris Froome conquering Mont Ventoux and the 15th stage of the tour! Anyone else loving this tour? (If you remember my bucket list, following the tour in person is one of my dreams)

Until tomorrow,

Love Froogs xxxx


19 comments:

  1. Hi froogs, I wonder if you would consider doing a day for a couple of teenagers and me (mum). I am a good cook, but I think children learn better from someone other than a parent! My eldest daughter will be leaving home this sept and then next year my son will be off. I would love them to have a down to earth day on food planning, budgeting and some simple recipes - but that might be too much for one day! We are in Plymouth, so not far from you, and Could come to you or you to us. Thanks, kate

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    1. I would love to - email me on janemclark@hotmail.com and we can agree a suitable date - come to me and save yourselves the washing up

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    2. Just wanted to say hello fellow Plymouthian

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  2. Vertical weeding - now that's a new one! I bet you both had great tans by the end of the day.
    Love from Mum
    xx

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  3. Congrats to Chris Froome though I personally don't follow the tour, only the last day to see if it passes near where I live ... and completely off-topic, you have fab hair; good genes ?x

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  4. Froogs,

    Any ideas for adult packed lunches. Getting bored of sarnies and salads.

    Thanks
    Sarah. X

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  5. We too live in liskeard - a very hot afternoon for weeding . We stayed in the cool this afternoon to watch the tour on tv. My husband cycled up mont Ventoux a couple of years ago and then stayed on the mountain to watch the tour stage finish. Next Sunday he will be in Paris with his Cornish flag hopefully seeing frome on the podium. Love your radio slot and all your fantastic advice xx

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  6. You were both brave or mad doing all that gardening in this heat. I moan about cutting all my Cornish hedges but I only have to use a chair. We are also putting our house on the market. I have got lots of sorting out and painting but it's just to hot. I'm dreading keeping the house tidy for viewings. It's going to be hard work with 5 dogs and various other animals. Good luck with your sale.
    Rosezeeta.

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  7. In the BBC programme I thought the person visiting the single mum with two kids was bonkers when she said to buy chicken 'fillets' (breasts?) instead of a whole chicken because you were 'buying the bone', crazy, you can do much more with a whole chicken and it will be much cheaper.
    Also, I too was wondering about Hardup Hester? Gone...........

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  8. I really enjoy listening to your radio appearances; even though I am a looong way from Cornwall, your suggestions apply everywhere. The point one you made about gluten free/wheat free diets; I believe that only diagnosed coeliacs can get gluten free food on prescription. I have just searched it, and it does appear to be the case, so I, who have a wheat intolerance, can't get a prescription. I'm not saying this is unfair, because I can eat a certain amount of wheat, some of the time, unlike a coeliac, and I have no problem at all with oats or rye. But it is more expensive and I have to fight for every penny even more. Thank heaven, finally we have been able to re-introduce potatoes into my husband's diet, although cheese is still a big no-no for him. It's hard to introduce culprit foods, because we can't afford to risk making him ill and miss work, or he won't get paid. Food intolerances are a pain in the neck, or bowel in our case!

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  9. I am a mature student and my husband has to work a full-time job and 2 part-time jobs just so we can survive. I have to be so clever with money so that our 2 children have what they need and I always dread this time of year, keeping them occupied with very little money is not easy, and like you I have searched the internet to find out what is going on in our local area for free or very cheap, there is nothing. so on Friday I asked a friend of mine if he was willing to put a 'Film Friday' on for the children of this area, he was willing and so at least they will have a half day to look forward to without it hurting my purse!! We had to ask the local vicar if we could have use of the church hall and he agreed, but he also asked us to run a holiday club every Tuesday, so there is another day for us to look forward to! I have the added worry this year as my youngest son is starting high school and so I have to buy him a school uniform. I make packed lunches for my husband and my sons, they usually have 2 rolls, crisps, a drink and home-made cakes. I have been so inspired by your blog that I have only allowed myself £25 a week to spend of food and so far I am spending a lot less! Please don't publish this. Many thanks Donna x

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  10. The message that i think needs to get over to those who are struggling to feed a family is that frugal cooking is a completely different way of spending the food budget and eating. It's planning, batch cooking, home baking, freezing meals, using in season food, making use of cheaper protein sources etc. and having three good meals a day.

    When i shop in Farm Foods i see so many families on low incomes filling a trolley full of processed food plus an equal amount of snacks. The reason they buy so many snacks is that the processed rubbish does not keep people full so they need to snack between meals. Processed rubbish also keeps people wanting more rubbish due to the high sugar, salt and fat content. I also see many of these families buying a lot of fizzy sugary drinks and energy drinks.

    Frugal cooking provides a healthy long lasting meal, so you don't need to snack between meals and you certainly don't need energy drinks! The real financial benefit of frugal cooking, is in the overall cost for a families food in a week not just meal by meal.

    I work in the healthcare industry in a very poor community. On a daily basis my staff and i have to mentor patients on healthy eating. Most of our patients have absolutely no idea of how to put a healthy meal together and the ignorance is staggering even in the elderly. It is really rewarding seeing the difference that a small amount of help can make.

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  11. Goodness me! How did you do all that weeding in that heat? I was cowering in the front room with a hand fan all day :) I've never known Liskeard so hot, so respect to you.

    On the foodie front, my Mum made sure I could at least cook beans on toast (and a few lovely nutritious meals too) before I moved out. I'm living in a house that's more than £150 above my means per month, so I've had to teach myself how to cook cheap, nutritious food. And how to budget. They're both things that no-one thinks to teach youngsters anymore, so I think the cooking classes are a great idea!

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  12. In Australia many schools have adopted the Stephanie Alexander gardening program as part of their curriculum. The program teaches children from early primary up to cultivate a food garden and to cook nourishing meals from produce they have grown. The children learn that fresh fruit and vegetables can be made into very tasty meals and hopefully take their knowledge of growing and preparing wholesome food into their homes. There are so many opportunities for communities to follow Stephanie Alexander's lead through community garden programs, the establishment of urban food forests and other means to using urban spaces to grow food. When people learn to grow their own food they achieve a degree of food security. History has proven this many times. During the war years the English allotments gardens kept people fed and in the early to mid 1990's Cuban's turned to urban agriculture to divert starvation when their economy collapsed after the Russians withdrew the supply of oil.

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  14. I too have been wondering about Hardup Hester. Her blog disappeared so abruptly ...

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  15. I'd be interested to see a video on using a bread machine if you get time (tho don't know how you fit everything in as it is).

    I haven't got one yet - but I'm watching those pennies and hope to have a bread machine by the winter.

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    1. Hi, I recently took Froogs advice and bought the same breadmaker as her.

      It is so easy I just come in from work, throw the ingredients in, which takes a few minutes as i have them all to hand.Then press the start and later i have a lovely loaf for about 25p! The breadmaker also has a timer which i have not used yet, so i could have fresh bread when i come in from work. I have also made pizza dough and bread rolls which were all amazing, my family love it.

      It is quicker than me nipping to the shops and stops those naughty impulse buys whilst i am there!!

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  16. That's amazingly generous. Rev T spend some time at a church that hosted a food bank. A retired domestic science teacher used to come in once a week. She gave cookery lessons and advice about what to do with what you were given / what you already had. Three days worth of emergency food is only so much use if you don't know what to do with it. My nine year old is getting basic cookery lessons over the holidays - gotta start somewhere!

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